BETWEEN THE LINES a frontline devotional

The Potential of a Seed (Part 2)

Day 30

“And those sown on the good (well-adapted) soil are the ones who hear the Word and receive and accept and welcome it and bear fruit-some thirty times as much as was sown, some sixty times as much, and some [even] a hundred times as much.”

– Mark 4:20

As Christians, we are challenged by God’s Word to spread the Good News of the Gospel and to win others to Christ.  In Mark 4, Jesus tells the Parable of the Sower and tells of the possible challenges we may face while trying to bring others to Christ.  However, in Mark 4:20, Jesus reveals the potential of sowing the seed of God’s Word into someone’s life.  He says that sowing that seed into good ground may bear fruit thirty, sixty, or even hundred times as much.  This amazing harvest can seem very exciting or very intimidating. You may think, how can I share the Word with someone if I’m not very outgoing? You may even be scared or just can’t seem to find the right words to say in the moment.  The good thing is that we don’t have to do anything without God’s help.  God has fully equipped us for this situation, and to fully understand this we can look at the structure of a seed.  Scientifically, a seed is generally made of three parts: an embryo, nutrients, and a protective seed coat.  The embryo is the beginning, it is the potential of the seed.  The nutrients are encapsulated inside with the embryo, so it has all it needs to survive.  The seed coat protects the embryo from anything on the outside trying to get in, and prevents anything needed on the inside from getting out.  In John 12:24, Jesus showed that He was the seed that needed to die, so that we, the harvest, could be produced.  All seeds produce copies of themselves. We were made in God’s image to be seeds to be sown.  God equipped us with everything we need to be bold witnesses for Him. He protects us while we develop into the strong fearless disciples we were meant to be, and then sends us out to produce a great harvest.

Stay Strong and Carry On,

Carrington